photoblog

Moonlight

“Moonlight does things to a street scene that no other natural or man-made phenomenon can effect. People walk slower, their smiles lingering on contended faces. Horses that usually move along fast enough to stir up the dust off the street plod lazily in the clear, cool night. And in dark corners where people forget to look, the goons come out.”
― Bailey Bristol, The Devil’s Dime

While the quote above refers to actual moonlight, I’ve long enjoyed the quirkiness of the street scene created by the service counter entrance to Moonlight Starter and Generator. In business for nearly 40 years, it’s a quiet place where things do seem to move slower. You may notice in the photo how things are “in dark corners where people forget to look”, though perhaps not so much forgotten as ignored.

"Moonlight Starter" [Click the image to enlarge/reduce its size.] Nikon D300, ISO 320, f/3.3 at 1/4000 sec., 85 mm

“Moonlight Starter” [Click the image to enlarge/reduce its size.] Nikon D300, ISO 320, f/3.3 at 1/4000 sec., 85 mm

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I’m still hoping for your vote in the 2013 COOL PHOTOBLOG AWARDS. Remember, there’s nothing to fill out, no gimmicks, no requests for your email address – just a simple click and you’re done. THANK YOU for your support!

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I’m on Instagram at @EarlHarrisPhoto, where I am posting photos captured and edited solely on my iPhone. If you like cat photos, I seem to be posting a lot of them there… #instagramcats

Tar

I created this image a while back and just put it aside. It’s one that, despite its intended “ugliness”, I really like. The shadows were added or grossly enhanced in post-production. When I saw this image in my mind, its name came along with the vision. It is a reflection of the darkness — the “tar” — we sometimes find ourselves stuck in.

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"Tar" [Click on image to enlarge/reduce its size.] Nikon D300, ISO 320, f/1.8 at 1/1500 sec., 85 mm

“Tar” [Click on the image to enlarge/reduce its size.] Nikon D300, ISO 320, f/1.8 at 1/1500 sec., 85 mm

 

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Still begging for your vote in the 2013 COOL PHOTOBLOG AWARDS. As I’ve stated before, there’s nothing to fill out, no gimmicks, no requests for your email address – just a simple click and you’re done. THANK YOU for your support!

 

You can also find me on Instagram at @EarlHarrisPhoto, where I am posting photos captured and edited solely on my iPhone.

The Darkroom: A Luddite’s Tale

I got my first digital camera from my father in 2007: a Nikon D100. I have to admit I was slow to pick it up and try it. It was a difficult transition for me, since my love for photography began in the darkroom and not behind a camera. Photography was supposed to include a dimension of wonderful chemically smells and the joy of lost weekends in the darkroom. And there is that magical span of minutes when a print sits in developer: you watch it materialize on the paper you carefully and purposefully painted with light from the enlarger. I wasn’t ready to let go and leave those things behind. You see, I grew up enjoying there always being a dedicated darkroom in any home we ever lived in. My father is a man of few hobbies, but he always made sure the one he still loves most was accommodated.

My own love for the darkroom has never waned, though its accessibility has. When James was diagnosed with cancer last year, we swiftly vacated our Utah home and moved to Florida to seek more hopeful treatment options and cut the distance between us and our families. I can still hear the hollow sound of the basement darkroom door closing as I pulled it shut for the last time on that Wednesday morning in September. The equipment I have continued to use since childhood – including the still-perfect stainless steel 35 mm film tank I learned to wind film on about 43 years ago – sits packed away in boxes. I wonder when – perhaps if – the darkroom will ever see the light again.

Necessity has a way of increasing our appreciation for just about anything. The process doesn’t smell the same or make my fingers slippery with developer, but I can admit I love digital photography, too.

Nikon D100, ISO 200, f/5.6 at 1/250, 80 mm

[Click image to expand/shrink its size.]  ©2007, Nikon D100, ISO 200, f/5.6 at 1/250, 80 mm

Tomorrow’s post will be No. 5 in the “Faces of Kissimmee” series. See you then.

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Street Portraiture: Faces of Kissimmee, #1

I am taking on a new personal street portraiture project, which I am calling “Faces of Kissimmee.” A once-small town in Central Florida, Kissimmee has tons of historic charm and character. In 1950, the population of Kissimmee was a mere 4,310 people. These residents primarily made their living either cattle ranching or growing citrus. When Walt Disney World opened its gates in 1971, Kissimmee was thrust into an unprecedented age of growth and forever changed. Its primary industries are now travel and tourism. In the wake of that change, the population has grown to more than 60,000 people.

Mark [Click image to view larger size.] Nikon D300, ISO 320, f/2.4 at 1/750 sec., 85 mm

Mark [Click image to view larger size.] Nikon D300, ISO 320, f/2.4 at 1/750 sec., 85 mm

I am going to be concentrating on random, unstaged street portraits for this series, and posting the photos here on “I Shutter at the Thought!”. It is my hope you will enjoy viewing some of the faces I encounter on the streets of Kissimmee, Florida.

Want to be featured in this project? If you’re in Kissimmee, send me an email and let’s set something up! There is no cost or obligation other than consent for me to use your photo.

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topaz

Cycle of Tides (Free Wallpaper!)

“To stand at the edge of the sea, to sense the ebb and flow of the tides, to feel the breath of a mist moving over a great salt marsh, to watch the flight of shore birds that have swept up and down the surf lines of the continents for untold thousands of years, to see the running of the old eels and the young shad to the sea, is to have knowledge of things that are as nearly eternal as any earthly life can be.”
– Rachel Carson

[Click image to view larger size] Nikon D300, ISO 320, f/9.5 at 1/60 sec., 200 mm

[Click image to view larger size] Nikon D300, ISO 320, f/9.5 at 1/60 sec., 200mm
You can purchase a print here.

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If you’d like a FREE Hi-Res Desktop Wallpaper copy of this image, please click here to request one.


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Long Out of Gas But Not Out of Go

Very special prayers for peace, healing and understanding in the wake of the evil and cowardly bombings in Boston yesterday.

“Love one another…”; “love your neighbor…”; “love one another as yourself…”; “love your enemies…”; “God is love…”
Why don’t we get it? Why can’t we do it?

Today’s photo is another one from last week’s Daytona Beach photo walk. What appears from this image to be an old gas station is, in reality, now a popular and thriving local drinking establishment. So I guess it’s fair to say people fuel up around here, just in a very different way.

Nikon D300, ISO 200, f/5.6 at 1/180 sec, 52 mm

Nikon D300, ISO 200, f/5.6 at 1/180 sec, 52 mm

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You know the drill: if you like a post, please Like or comment on it. I consider each one a virtual hug, and I need lots and lots of hugs. God bless!

Cleo the Cat

“The cat is above all things a dramatist.”
– Margaret Benson

Tortie’s seem to have very distinct and vocal personalities. Cleo is no different. At 11 years old, she is very affectionate and very curious, but very specific about wanting things on her terms. It took a while to gain her confidence and peak her interest in what was going on, but eventually the moment came. Here’s the photo; I hope she likes it.

Nikon D300, ISO 200, f/2.0 at 1/250 sec, 50 mm

Nikon D300, ISO 200, f/2.0 at 1/250 sec, 50 mm

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If you missed my earlier post with tips for improving your cat photos, you can read it here.

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Baby Lydia

“The only creatures that are evolved enough to convey pure love are dogs and infants.”
― Johnny Depp

I had the good fortune of photographing beautiful 6-month old Lydia at the park yesterday. It was a fun session, as Lydia is a very expressive little girl with a wonderful demeanor. Thanks to Jenna and Jon for providing me the opportunity to photograph their darling daughter.

Nikon D300, ISO 320, f/2.0 at 1/4000 sec, 35 mm

Nikon D300, ISO 320, f/2.0 at 1/4000 sec, 35 mm

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Martha

It was a nice morning in north Georgia. Martha sat on her front porch with a fresh cup of coffee. She talked about the home across the road that had recently and somewhat suspiciously burned down. The sunlight was illuminating her face quite nicely… >>Click<<

Nikon D300, ISO 640, f3.3 at 1/350 sec., 50 mm

Nikon D300, ISO 640, f3.3 at 1/350 sec., 50 mm

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HDR in Ruins: Help Wanted

Please, I need your help!

Over the Easter holiday weekend, I got the opportunity to sit down and work with some photographs I captured in Stockton, Utah in July of last year. I had just gotten my Mamiya 645 Super medium-format film camera, and wanted to take it out and shoot a couple of rolls of film. An earlier post featured one of the B&W photos from the Mamiya film shoot, but I had never even looked at the digital images I got at the same time.

I recall that my intuition had me thinking that the early morning light and the landscape that lay in front of me was the perfect combination for some interesting HDR images. I therefore bracketed all of my shots for each scene by a half stop. I haven’t done a lot of HDR work to-date, but it is a technique I’ve become more and more intrigued with for its ability to show so much detail and texture. And if you’ve come to this site with any regularity, you know how I’m drawn to textures.

So here they are. I’m pretty happy with the results and think I might like to have a metal print made of the best image from this series. The problem is, I can’t decide which one is the “best image”. That’s where your help comes in; which one would you choose to print? Please leave your opinion/comments below. Thanks.

#1

Nikon D300, ISO 200, bracketed aperture for HDR conversion at 1/125th sec.

Nikon D300, ISO 200, bracketed aperture for HDR conversion at 1/125th sec.

#2

Nikon D300, ISO 200, bracketed aperture for HDR conversion at 1/125th sec.

Nikon D300, ISO 200, bracketed aperture for HDR conversion at 1/125th sec.

#3

Nikon D300, ISO 200, bracketed aperture for HDR conversion at 1/125th sec.

Nikon D300, ISO 200, bracketed aperture for HDR conversion at 1/125th sec.

#4

Nikon D300, ISO 200, bracketed aperture for HDR conversion at 1/125th sec.

Nikon D300, ISO 200, bracketed aperture for HDR conversion at 1/125th sec.

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