Sandhill Bokeh

This Florida Sandhill crane wasn’t too concerned about the guy crouched in the bush aiming a camera at it. The time of day and the sunlight caused the red crest to glimmer and appears over-saturated in the photo. In truth, I decreased the saturation to bring in blown out detail. What I liked best about this photo was the contrast of the crane against the browns and greens of the nice bokeh backdrop (if you just met a new word, “bokeh” is the term for the fuzzy visual quality of the out of focus areas). I wish the feathers along the crane’s neck were sharper, but that’s my own fault for using a large aperture to get the bokeh effect. I intentionally left the image a bit dark, as it more closely reflects the actual setting. I might change my mind about that and brighten it up when I come back and look at it again later. The green cast under the beak is whatever it is that grows plentifully on the surface of the body of water it was eating from. I offered it a clean paper towel I had in my camera bag, but it declined, turned and walked away. Yep. It’s definitely from around here.

"Sandhill Bokeh", Nikon D800, ISO 200, f/5.6 at 1/60 sec., 300mmClick for enlarged view.

“Sandhill Bokeh”, Nikon D800, ISO 200, f/5.6 at 1/60 sec., 300mm
Click for enlarged view.

=^,,^=
earlharrisphotography
Photographing people, places, pets and ponderings.
Booking family, personal, business and pet portrait sittings throughout Central Florida.

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7 comments

  1. Beautiful! It’s nice to see a bird photo from you. I think that the term “bokeh” comes from the Japanese word 暈け (‘boke’) which means “blur” and often used in photo terminology here. I had no idea it was used in English as well 🙂

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      1. I completely agree, its interesting (and fascinating) how words get assimilated into different languages. And of course I don’t mean to imply that you didn’t know it was derived from Japanese, just meant to say that I wasn’t aware it was used in other languages 🙂

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