HDR in Ruins: Help Wanted

Please, I need your help!

Over the Easter holiday weekend, I got the opportunity to sit down and work with some photographs I captured in Stockton, Utah in July of last year. I had just gotten my Mamiya 645 Super medium-format film camera, and wanted to take it out and shoot a couple of rolls of film. An earlier post featured one of the B&W photos from the Mamiya film shoot, but I had never even looked at the digital images I got at the same time.

I recall that my intuition had me thinking that the early morning light and the landscape that lay in front of me was the perfect combination for some interesting HDR images. I therefore bracketed all of my shots for each scene by a half stop. I haven’t done a lot of HDR work to-date, but it is a technique I’ve become more and more intrigued with for its ability to show so much detail and texture. And if you’ve come to this site with any regularity, you know how I’m drawn to textures.

So here they are. I’m pretty happy with the results and think I might like to have a metal print made of the best image from this series. The problem is, I can’t decide which one is the “best image”. That’s where your help comes in; which one would you choose to print? Please leave your opinion/comments below. Thanks.

#1

Nikon D300, ISO 200, bracketed aperture for HDR conversion at 1/125th sec.

Nikon D300, ISO 200, bracketed aperture for HDR conversion at 1/125th sec.

#2

Nikon D300, ISO 200, bracketed aperture for HDR conversion at 1/125th sec.

Nikon D300, ISO 200, bracketed aperture for HDR conversion at 1/125th sec.

#3

Nikon D300, ISO 200, bracketed aperture for HDR conversion at 1/125th sec.

Nikon D300, ISO 200, bracketed aperture for HDR conversion at 1/125th sec.

#4

Nikon D300, ISO 200, bracketed aperture for HDR conversion at 1/125th sec.

Nikon D300, ISO 200, bracketed aperture for HDR conversion at 1/125th sec.

=^..^=

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13 comments

  1. I agree with Lauren. They are all ‘stunning.’ I think in #1, depending on what’s there in the camera shot, rather than center the building, moving the building slightly farther to the left would hide some of the bare landscape and perhaps add move ‘flavor’ to the image.

    I sorta like #4 as the best, It has more 3D and requires the viewer to study it more.

    Like

  2. I’ve been meaning to put in my $.02 here for a while now, Earl, but just haven’t gotten around to it. It’s great that you’re getting back to the blogging on a more regular basis, great stuff!

    Now, as for my vote here … I go with No. 3 though it’s tough to choose here, all fabulous shots. But No. 3, for me … I don’t know, that tree just adds that “sparseness” to an already barren landscape and makes a good shot even better. Keep up the excellent work!

    Like

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